Tag Archives: Minnesota Permit to Carry

Why is Our Minnesota Permit to Carry Class only $50?

I think of all the questions we get about Maple Grove Firearms, this is the most common question.  The short answer as to why we charge so little is because we’re in it for the cause of the 2nd Amendment.  We’re not doing this to make a lot of money.

None of us who teach or work in this business depend on the income.  We all do it because we believe in a person’s right to self-defense wherever they find themselves legally.  This means carrying in public.

So, we keep the cost low so that cost isn’t a reason for a person to not get their permit.

We also find that more people attend our class and the energy created by having 20-40 people in the room is positive and constructive.  And, with that number of people, we can justify the cost of privately renting the range so that we can call the group together and teach on the range without the possibility of someone shooting while we’re talking/teaching.

We (nearly) always get high/rave reviews on our class because we take the time to really teach about the law and firearms safety.  Then we ask that each student shoots 50 rounds and show that you can safely handle a firearm.

Our Minnesota Permit to Carry class is the best value in the Twin Cities. Consider taking our class, whether your new to firearms or you’ve been carrying for 30 years.

Do You Have a Duty to Inform?

In Minnesota, when you are stopped by state or local police, do you have a duty to inform them that you’re legally carrying a firearm before being asked by a peace officer?

The short answer is “no”. Minnesota law states: “The holder of a permit to carry must have the permit card and a driver’s license, state identification card, or other government-issued photo identification in immediate possession at all times when carrying a pistol and must display the permit card and identification document upon lawful demand by a peace officer…” (624.714, Subd 1b). So in Minnesota, only after you are asked by a peace officer must you show him/her your permit to carry license.

If you don’t have your permit with you, the peace officer can charge you with a petty misdemeanor. The fine for the first offense is not more than $25 and your firearm is not subject to forfeiture. However, if you can produce your license later in court or in the office of the arresting officer, Minnesota law states that the citation must be dismissed.

Since the license does not contain your picture, if the officer chooses to do so, s/he can lawfully require you to write a sample signature in the officer’s presence to verify your identity. Presumably, your sample signature would be compared to the one on the license you produced to ensure you are who you claim to be.

In all encounters with peace officers, when you’re carrying, it is a good (real good) idea to make sure that you treat them with respect and that you follow all orders, even if you feel they are in violation of law or your constitutional rights. The time to argue your points is not with the officer – it is in court. Treat the officers with respect and chances are good that they’ll do the same in return.

Bill English
Founder, Maple Grove Firearms

Validity of Utah Conceal Carry Permit when you Change States of Residence

Recently, a customer asked us if their non-resident Utah Conceal Carry permit would still be legal if they moved out of Minnesota and took up residence in another state. Since the application process in Utah requires that you have a valid permit in your home state, our customer was wondering if you changed your residence to a different state other than the one in which you applied for your Utah permit, would that invalidate your Utah Conceal Carry Permit?

The answer is that as long as you have a valid Permit in your home state – in this case, the Minnesota Permit to Carry license – at the time of your application for Utah’s Conceal Carry license, then Utah license is valid until its’ renewal date. At that point, you’ll need to have a valid permit to carry or conceal carry license in your home state to renew your Utah Conceal Carry permit.

We recommend that if you move, you swiftly get your new home state’s permit as well. It’s just better if the police stop you and you can produce a valid permit from your home state. Just like you get a new driver’s license, so you should look to get a new permit to carry or conceal carry license in your new home state as well.

Differences Between New and Renewal for the Minnesota Permit to Carry License

We often get asked “What is the difference between getting a new Minnesota Permit to Carry license and a renewed Minnesota Permit to Carry license? The answer can be summed up in one word: “None.”

Minnesota State Law does not differentiate between new and renewal permits for the Permit to Carry license. The elements that are required to be taught in a permit to carry class are the same regardless of whether or not you’re apply for the first time or getting your existing Permit to Carry license renewed.

The statue reads as follows:

Subd. 2a. Training in the safe use of a pistol. (a)

An applicant must present evidence that the applicant received

training in the safe use of a pistol within one year of the date

of an original or renewal application. Training may be

demonstrated by:

(1) employment as a peace officer in the state of Minnesota

within the past year; or

(2) completion of a firearms safety or training course

providing basic training in the safe use of a pistol and

conducted by a certified instructor.

(b) Basic training must include:

(1) instruction in the fundamentals of pistol use;

(2) successful completion of an actual shooting qualification exercise; and

(3) instruction in the fundamental legal aspects of pistol

possession, carry, and use, including self-defense and the

restrictions on the use of deadly force.

(c) The certified instructor must issue a certificate to a

person who has completed a firearms safety or training course

described in paragraph (b). The certificate must be signed by

the instructor and attest that the person attended and completed

the course.

(d) A person qualifies as a certified instructor if the

person is certified as a firearms instructor within the past

five years by an organization or government entity that has been

approved by the Department of Public Safety in accordance with

the department’s standards.

(e) A sheriff must accept the training described in this

subdivision as meeting the requirement in subdivision 2,

paragraph (b), for training in the safe use of a pistol. A

sheriff may also accept other satisfactory evidence of training

in the safe use of a pistol.

 

As you can see, Minnesota statues don’t even have a concept of a renewal vs. new permit. This is something that has been developed over time by the training companies in their marketing materials.

At least for us, this is why the cost of a permit to carry class is the same – regardless of whether or not it is for a new permit or a renewal. The education elements are the same. Next time you need to sit a class for the Minnesota Permit to Carry license, please consider Maple Grove Firearms. You won’t be disappointed with our education classes.

Bill English, NRA Instructor

Armed Citizen in Maine, Ohio and California

Take a look at these three recent reports of law-abiding citizens defending themselves.  This is one of the reasons we have the 2nd Amendment and one of the reasons we’re in business:  we believe in the cause and right of self-defense.  While we do not rejoice in the death of anyone, we also recognize each person’s right to defend themselves.

All three of these stories occur inside the person’s home.  But this doesn’t negate the need for training in the use of a firearm and for familiarity on the legal ramifications of using that firearm.  Consider our Minnesota Permit to Carry class as the first logical step in your journey to defend yourself.

Read the stories here.

 

How Do I Get a Minnesota Permit to Carry License?

Many people in Minnesota are confused about the process required to obtain a Minnesota Permit to Carry license. We believe that all things being equal, most would want to get their license if they knew how to get it. So in this post, we’ll outline the steps you need to take to get your Minnesota Permit to Carry license.

(You can download for free a visual aid that outlines the five basic steps for obtaining your Minnesota Permit to Carry License.)

First, you need to ensure that you are not prohibited from being granted this license. Minnesota statutes are clear on who cannot receive a license to carry a pistol in public. Taken from the Minnesota Permit to Carry application (you are responsible to read these statues and ensure that you do not meet any of the qualifications in these statues. If you’re confused about them, please consult a lawyer.):

“The following statutes describe persons that are prohibited from possessing a firearm:

  1. Minnesota Statutes, §518B.01, subdivision 14 – Violation of an Order for Protection.
  2. Minnesota Statutes, §609.224, subdivision 3 – Assault in the 1st through 5th Degree with firearms.
  3. Minnesota Statutes, §609.2242, subdivision 3 – Domestic assaults with firearms.
  4. Minnesota Statutes, §609.749, subdivision 8 – Harassment; Stalking; Firearms.
  5. Minnesota Statutes, §624.713 – Certain persons not to have pistols or semiautomatic military-style assault weapons.
  6. Minnesota Statutes, §624.719 – Possession of a firearm by non-resident alien.
  7. Minnesota Statutes, §629.715, subdivision 2 – Surrender of firearms as condition of release.
  8. Minnesota Statutes, §629.72, subdivision 2 – Judicial review that prohibits person from possessing a firearm.
  9. Minnesota Statutes, §299C.091 – Listed in the criminal gang investigation system.

    Note: Federal laws, not listed herein, may also prohibit possession of a firearm for certain persons.”

    Secondly, you need to ensure that you meet the qualifications for a Minnesota Permit to Carry license. Now quoting:

    “For Minnesota residents, individuals may obtain permits to carry a pistol by submitting an application and other related documentation to the sheriff in the county where the applicant resides. Non-residents may apply to any Minnesota county sheriff.

    Applicant requirements:
    -Must be at least 21 years of age.
    -Must complete an application form.
    -Must not be prohibited from possessing a firearm.
    -Must not be listed in the criminal gang investigation system.
    -Must be a resident of the county from which you are requesting a permit if you reside in Minnesota.

    Non-residents may apply to any Minnesota county sheriff and provide the sheriff with either the I-551 or I-151 card that has been issued.
    -Must provide certificate of completed authorized firearms training. Training by a certified instructor and completed within one year prior to applying for a permit to carry.”

    Thirdly, you must complete authorized firearms training from an authorized Business Organization Approved to Train Instructors, such as Maple Grove Firearms. Here is the relevant statue for the training requirements:

    Subd. 2a. Training in the safe use of a pistol.

    (a) An applicant must present evidence that the applicant received training in the safe use of a pistol within one year of the date of an original or renewal application. Training may be demonstrated by:

    (1) employment as a peace officer in the state of Minnesota within the past year; or

    (2) completion of a firearms safety or training course providing basic training in the safe use of a pistol and conducted by a certified instructor.

    (b) Basic training must include:

    (1) instruction in the fundamentals of pistol use;

    (2) successful completion of an actual shooting qualification exercise; and

    (3) instruction in the fundamental legal aspects of pistol possession, carry, and use, including self-defense and the restrictions on the use of deadly force.

    (c) The certified instructor must issue a certificate to a person who has completed a firearms safety or training course described in paragraph (b). The certificate must be signed by the instructor and attest that the person attended and completed the course.

    (d) A person qualifies as a certified instructor if the person is certified as a firearms instructor within the past five years by an organization or government entity that has been approved by the Department of Public Safety in accordance with the department’s standards.

    (e) A sheriff must accept the training described in this subdivision as meeting the requirement in subdivision 2, paragraph (b), for training in the safe use of a pistol. A sheriff may also accept other satisfactory evidence of training in the safe use of a pistol.

    Fourthly, after completing your training, you must apply to your county Sheriff for the license. The Sheriff will have 30 days to respond and must issue you a license if s/he has no legal reason to keep you from having a license, as outlined above. The Sheriff cannot use personal bias to make this decision.

    The license will come to you in the mail and will be valid for five years.

    If you have any questions about obtaining your Minnesota Permit to Carry license, you’re always welcome to call us at 763-458-3722.

Is Minnesota an Open Carry State?

This is a question we receive quit often in our Minnesota Permit to Carry classes: “Can I legally carry my firearm in the open? Or am I forced to conceal it?”

The short answer is “Yes”. Minnesota is an open carry state. This is why the license is a “permit to carry” not a “conceal carry” one, because in Minnesota, you are allowed to legally carry a firearm in the open if you have a legal and current Minnesota Permit to Carry license.

Now, we don’t recommend that you open carry. We recommend you conceal it anyways, especially with the anti-gun folks in charge of both houses and the Governorship right now. Let’s not stir up any trouble or create reasons for people to contact their legislators to have the laws changed. So, it is our recommendation that you not open carry.

Minnesota Permit to Carry Private Classes

Here at Maple Grove Firearms, we’re busy conducting several private classes for the Minnesota Permit to Carry license. We have a reasonable price of $500 for us to train up to 15 people in a group. These private classes are not advertised on our website, so sometimes, we end up having a thin public class schedule because we’re busy doing private classes. At 15 people, each person’s cost is $33 – a serious bargain if you can pull together the folks for the class.

In just April and May of 2014, we will have conducted 3 private events – one for a group of 15 people, one for a group of 6 and another for a group of 12.

Our fee of $500 doesn’t include any extras, such as pizza, range time, eyes, ears, ammunition or books. All of those elements will cost extra – we can discuss this with you when you contact us to schedule a private event. We’ll come to your house or place of business or community site to do the course instruction and then we’ll use a range here in Maple Grove, Rogers or Osseo for the shooting portion of the class. We’ll even split up the event into two evenings if that is better for you.

If you’re interested in a private Minnesota Permit to Carry course or our NRA Home Firearm Safety course, call Bill English at 763-458-3722 to discuss your options and when you might want to hold your own, personalized Minnesota Permit to Carry class.

More Guns, Less Crime

This is a must read for any person who is interested in carrying a firearm for personal protection. This book clearly demonstrates that violent crime goes down when law-abiding citizens carry firearms. Getting your Permit to Carry from Minnesota is one of the most cost-effective ways you can help make our society more safe against violent crime.

This is a quote from the book – I suggest you read it:

Given the limited resources available to law enforcement and our desire to spend those resources wisely to reduce crime, the results of my studies have implications for where police should concentrate their efforts. For example, I found that increasing arrest rates in the most crime-prone areas led to the greatest reductions in crime. Comparisons can also be made across different methods of fighting crime. Of all the methods studied so far by economists, the carrying of concealed handguns appears to be the most cost-effective method for reducing crime. Accident and suicide rates were unaltered by the presence of concealed handguns. Guns also appear to be the great equalizer among the sexes. Murder rates decline when either more women or more men carry concealed handguns, but the effect is especially pronounced for women. One additional woman carrying a concealed handgun reduces the murder rate for women by about 3– 4 times more than one additional man carrying a concealed handgun reduces the murder rate for men. This occurs because allowing a woman to defend herself changes her ability to defend herself much more than it would for a man. After all, men are usually bigger and stronger. While some evidence indicates that increased penalties for using a gun in the commission of a crime reduce crime, the effect is small. Furthermore, I find no crime-reduction benefits from state-mandated waiting periods and background checks before allowing people to purchase guns. At the federal level, the Brady law has proven to be no more effective. Surprisingly, there is also little benefit from training requirements or age restrictions for concealed-handgun permits.

Lott, John R. (2013-01-29). More Guns, Less Crime: Understanding Crime and Gun Control Laws, Third Edition (Studies in Law and Economics) (Kindle Locations 597-609). University Of Chicago Press. Kindle Edition.

Bill English